EUROPEAN OSTEOPATHY

  ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

EUROPEAN OSTEOPATHY

What types of techniques do you use?

FASCIAL MANIPULATIONS

 

Fascia is a connective tissue organized as a three-dimensional network that surrounds, supports, suspends, protects, connects and divides muscular, skeletal and visceral components of the body. Studies suggest that fascia reorganizes itself along the lines of tension imposed or expressed in the body, and in ways that may cause repercussions to fascial restriction that are body-wide. This may potentially create stress on any structures enveloped by fascia itself, with consequent mechanical and physiological effects. From an osteopathic perspective, fascial techniques aim to release such tensions, decrease pain and restore function.

CRANIAL MANIPULATIONS

Cranio-sacral therapy consists of mindful, non-invasive fascial palpation techniques applied between the cranium and sacrum. Besides releasing myofascial structures, these manipulations intend to normalize sympathetic nerve activity by modifying craniosacral body rhythms. Reducing physiological arousal and switching to the parasympathetic mode may enhance the body’s ability for physiological regulation and tissue relaxation and decrease chronic pain.

VISCERAL MANIPULATIONS

Visceral osteopathy focuses on the intra-abdominal organs. Starting from the observation that intra-abdominal viscera naturally move (for example due to breathing), it is argued that this mobility could be disturbed in the same way that articular mobility can be disturbed. From a physiopathological point of view, these disturbances may trigger, increase or maintain musculoskeletal (e.g., low back pain) or gastrointestinal complaints (e.g., irritable bowel disorders), among others. Consequently, visceral manipulations aim to detect and treat these mobility disturbances.

« Anatomy is a living wholeness of function and should be seen as a mystery of form, not static academic structure. »

James S. Jealous, D.O.